Seeing What’s on the Plate

As a chef, I am constantly reminded about the visual component of our work. What a dish looks like on the plate is, today, as important as the taste and texture of the dish itself. In restaurants, around the globe, customers want to be visually impressed by the food on their plates. The colours and the shapes all contribute to the total food experience for the fine diner. Indeed, what the interior of the restaurant looks like, also, impacts upon the diner’s experience. What we eat, how we eat, where we eat are all factors in the equation.

Seeing What’s on the Plate

Which leads me to my topic, which is, seeing what’s on the plate; and how a chef’s vision, along with a waitperson’s vision and the supervising vision of a maître de are vital to the success of a fine dining establishment. If the chef and the kitchen staff cannot properly see what’s on the plate, then, how on earth are they going to serve up something visually impressive. When I first started cooking I was always much more concerned with how my food tasted. Obviously, I am still very concerned with that factor, but the look and texture of a dish is equally important to the overall dining experience. The myopic chef and the short sighted cook, cannot do justice to their food, if they are struggling with their optical abilities. Whether it be contact lenses or optical glasses the catering staff must be adequately equipped to see what’s on the plate.

Another important aspect is the overall design of the commercial kitchen and the impact this has upon the chef’s ability to see what’s on the plate. A badly designed kitchen can impair the vision of those working within it, when it comes to plating up and presenting food for the customers. Great deals on kitchen renovations in Adelaide make it possible to change the way you might see things whilst you are cooking. At home and professionally, you cannot underestimate the importance of kitchen design to the food that you produce.

The lighting inside your kitchen is paramount to seeing what’s on the plate. Good vision internally and externally impacts upon the cook’s ability to serve up excellent fare. For too long, too many people have put up with laisse fare facilities and equipment when it comes to cooking. Ordinary facilities produce ordinary food. Blind chefs cannot see, just, what’s on the plate.